Oklahoma women have few economic opportunities. Here’s how we can fix that.

by | October 7th, 2014 | Posted in Blog, Economy | Comments (0)
businesspeople

Photo from Penn State used under a Creative Commons license.

A report released last month from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) ranked all 50 states on economic opportunity for women. Oklahoma came in 43rd. However, a careful reading of the report shows that it’s not just women who are in trouble economically. In Oklahoma, both men and women are struggling to get ahead.

What’s in the report?

IWPR’s rankings were based on a composite of four ratings: median annual full-time, year-round earnings for women; the ratio of median earnings between women and men for full-time, year-round employment; the percent of women in the labor force; and the percent of employed women in managerial or professional occupations.

continue reading Oklahoma women have few economic opportunities. Here’s how we can fix that.

In The Know: Same-sex marriage now is legal in Oklahoma

by and | October 7th, 2014 | Posted in Blog, In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Gay and lesbian couples began marrying in Oklahoma after a surprise announcement from the U.S. Supreme Court that could quickly expand same-sex marriage to nearly two-thirds of the states. Among the first to get married were two Tulsa women who filed the lawsuit against Oklahoma’s same-sex marriage ban nearly ten years ago. SCOTUSBlog examined the implications of the Supreme Court’s action across the country.

Oklahoma Treasurer Ken Miller says Oklahoma’s gross revenue collections in September grew by more than 8 percent over receipts from the same month last year and that the growth was the highest monthly growth rate since April 2013. Gross revenue is everything the state brings in before paying back tax refunds and diverting revenue to mandatory programs. Treasurer Miller argued against an idea suggested by both Gov. Fallin and her challenger Rep. Joe Dorman to move Oklahoma to a two-year budget.

On the OK Policy Blog, we discussed warning signs that state leaders may overreact to a recent killing in Moore in ways that harm all of us. Curtis McCarty, who spent 19 years on Oklahoma’s death row before being exonerated by DNA evidence, spoke with Wichita Public Radio about his wrongful conviction and life behind bars.

Flu season is beginning and health officials recommend everyone older than 6 months get the flu vaccine. Debates and forums involving candidates for U.S. Senate, state superintendent of public instruction and Tulsa County district judge will be held this evening. The Together Tuesday tour by Together Oklahoma, a coalition led by OK Policy, is coming to Woodward this evening. The tour is a series of forums on the state of democracy in Oklahoma and how we can develop a state budget and tax system that better reflects our values. The City of Duncan, which is already facing a severe drought, is now dealing with contamination of its drinking water that violates federal standards.

The Number of the Day is the number of endangered species in Oklahoma. In today’s Policy Note, John Oliver offers a revealing look at civil forfeitures, a process which allows state and federal government to seize individuals’ property without convicting them of a crime.

continue reading In The Know: Same-sex marriage now is legal in Oklahoma

Don’t let fear make us dumb

by | October 6th, 2014 | Posted in Blog, Criminal Justice | Comments (1)
Photo by Anthony Gullen.

Photo by Anthony Gullen.

Recently a terrible crime has made the headlines in Oklahoma. Shortly after being fired from a food processing plant in Moore, Alton Nolen attacked two of his co-workers with a knife, beheading one and seriously injuring another.

The details of the crime are awful, and the perpetrator should be punished to the full extent of the law. However, our reaction to this incident could have repercussions far beyond Alton Nolen, his victims, and their families. There are already signs that state leaders may overreact in ways that harm all of us.

continue reading Don’t let fear make us dumb

In The Know: Oklahomans begin lining up before midnight for free medical care

by and | October 6th, 2014 | Posted in Blog, In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Oklahomans began lining up before midnight for a free medical care event by Remote Area Medical Oklahoma. Jaclyn Cosgrove shared stories from the event in a multi-part series for The Oklahoman. Oklahoma’s overdose death toll dipped slightly in 2013, from 850 to 821 deaths. About three-quarters of all overdose deaths in the state involve prescription drugs. The OK Policy Blog previously discussed why prescription drug abuse is Oklahoma’s biggest drug problem. NewsOK reported on how the city of Moore is responding to its latest tragedy to bring national attention.

The Oklahoma Ethics Commission has put a moratorium on ethics complaints during election season, which some are complaining allows candidates to skirt campaign laws. An Attorney General’s Office opinion has deemed electronic signatures on voter registration applications invalid. Electronic signature devices have been used to help people register to vote over the internet. Currently 27 states offer or are planning to implement online voter registration, but Oklahoma is not one of them. Oklahoma is planning to resume executions on November 13, but death penalty experts are questioning whether the state will be prepared to implement changes following the botched execution of Clayton Lockett. The Oklahoman outlined the planned changes to Oklahoma’s execution protocol.

Oklahoma Muslims are seeking to improve outreach to push back against the hateful rhetoric being spread by state Representative John Bennett. The Tulsa World reported that the Islamic Society of Greater Oklahoma City has received several threats of violence against Muslims after Bennett called them a “cancer that needed to be cut out of America.” The Oklahoma Department of Human Services is sharing a presentation on how much it costs to raise children to try to reduce Oklahoma’s teen pregnancy rate, which is the second-highest in the nation. Gun rights activists are pushing to make Oklahoma the latest state to legalize concealed carry of guns on college and university campuses.

Hundreds of rape kits have been collected from victims but not tested by the Tulsa Police Department due to lack of funding. Oklahoma wheat growers are calling on the U.S. Department of Agriculture to expand subsidized crop insurance to help their businesses survive the state’s ongoing drought. The Number of the Day is the growth in Oklahoma’s Asian-American population from 2000-2010. In today’s Policy Note, KGOU examined a new program that doubles how food stamp recipients can purchase at farmers’ markets.

continue reading In The Know: Oklahomans begin lining up before midnight for free medical care

The Weekly Wonk October 5, 2014

by | October 5th, 2014 | Posted in Blog, OK Policy | Comments (0)

the_weekly_wonkThe Weekly Wonk is a summary of Oklahoma Policy Institute’s events, publications, blog posts, and coverage. Numbers of the Day and Policy Notes are from our daily news briefing, In The KnowClick here to subscribe to In The Know.

On the OK Policy Blog, we explained why the lottery hasn’t solved Oklahoma’s education funding issues. We argued the conservative case for raising the minimum wage, and in our continuing discussion of Oklahoma’s broken democracy, we discussed barriers to voter participation.  In a guest post, Monica Barczak of Community Action Project Tulsa shared a new brief on WIC (Supplemental Nutrition for Women, Infants & Children) in Oklahoma and offered suggestions for reform.

On November 10th, OK Policy will host Dr. Lawrence R. Jacobs, a leading expert on health care policy, for his lunchtime talk “The 2014 Elections and the Future of Health Reform.” Click here to purchase tickets. We look forward to seeing you there.

This week on the OK PolicyCast, we talked with Executive Director David Blatt about the state of Oklahoma’s democracy, discussing why so few Oklahomans involve themselves in the process of choosing elected officials. You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunesStitcher, or RSS.

In his Journal Record column, Blatt called for a criminal justice system based on reason, not fear. KGOU aired a panel discussion on the legacy of Gov. Henry Bellmon following OK Policy’s presentation of the 2014 Good Sense/Good Cents award to Gov. Bellmon’s daughters at our Summer Policy Institute. In our Editorial of the Week, Randy Krehbiel of the Tulsa World explains how widening economic inequality is in part to blame for declining tax revenues.

Quote of the week:

“One thing that immediately stands out in White’s opinion is just how thin his legal reasoning is. Despite the fact that this case concerns a matter of life and death for the millions of Americans he orders uninsured, his actual discussion of the merits of this case comprises less than 7 double-spaced pages of his opinion. In that brief analysis he quotes the two other Republican judges who ordered Obamacare defunded, claiming that ‘the government offers no textual basis’ in the Affordable Care Act itself for treating federally-run exchanges the same as those run by states. In fact, the government has identified numerous provisions of the law which cut against the argument that only some exchanges should provide subsidies.”

- Ian Millhiser, a Senior Constitutional Policy Analyst at the Center for American Progress, writing about an U.S. District Judge’s decision upholding Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt’s lawsuit against the Affordable Care Act. The decision will be appealed to the 10th Circuit Court in Denver (Source: http://bit.ly/1vxaqY4).

See previous Quotes of the Day here.

Numbers of the day:

  • 3 to 1 – How much suicide deaths in Oklahoma outnumber homicides.
  • $26.42 – The median hourly wage for statisticians in Oklahoma.
  • 63,270 -Number of Oklahoma children who received subsidized childcare in 2013 so their parents can participate in employment or education.
  • 34 – Number of critical access hospitals in Oklahoma. Hospitals designated critical access hospitals are typically small (no more than 25 beds) and rural, and are the only acute-care option in isolated areas.
  • 27.8% – Percentage of income that renters in Oklahoma devoted to housing in 2013, up from 24.3 percent in 2000.

See previous Numbers of the Day here.

What we’re reading:

OK PolicyCast: Episode 10

by | October 3rd, 2014 | Posted in Podcast | Comments (0)

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunesStitcher, or RSS. The podcast theme music is by Zébre.

radio micThe OK PolicyCast brings you the most important news in Oklahoma, and what it means. This week we talk with David Blatt about the state of Oklahoma’s democracy. It’s election season, but a whole lot of Oklahomans aren’t voting or participating in any way in choosing who will take office. What’s holding us back?

We also share the top headlines, numbers of the week, and more.

You can download the podcast here or play it in your browser:

How to strengthen nutrition and health for Women, Infants & Children (Guest Post: Monica Barczak)

by | October 3rd, 2014 | Posted in Blog, Poverty & Opportunity | Comments (0)
Photo by Bev Sykes

Photo by Bev Sykes

Monica Barczak is Director of Innovation Lab at CAP Tulsa, where she leads a small team responsible for a variety of research and program design and improvement efforts.

A child’s successful growth and development depends on many factors, including good nutrition and health from the pre-natal period through the earliest months and years of life. Unfortunately, too many Oklahoma children lack sufficient nutrition, hampering their readiness for school and learning and triggering other health issues ranging from obesity to infections to increased risk of social-emotional problems.

While the private sector and faith-based community play a significant role in alleviating hunger in Oklahoma, such services tend to limit the number of times families can access help. But pregnant women and young children in particular need a consistent source of adequate nutrition to ensure healthy development. Federal nutrition programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly Food Stamps) and the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) are invaluable in filling the gap. So it is critical that such programs are designed to make the most impact for clients while operating in the most effective and efficient way. While WIC generally receives high marks among users, improvements could be made to help clients take full advantage of the program benefits.

continue reading How to strengthen nutrition and health for Women, Infants & Children (Guest Post: Monica Barczak)

In The Know: Dorman, Fallin meet in only debate

by | October 3rd, 2014 | Posted in Blog, In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Last night, Gov. Mary Fallin and Rep. Joe Dorman met in their only debate before November’s election. Transcript and video of the debate are available from C-SPAN. NewsOK reports that the gap between the parties of registered voters in Oklahoma is narrowing, with slightly more registered Democrats than Republicans in the state. OK Policy announced an upcoming event on the 2014 elections and the future of health reform.

A lawsuit filed Thursday challenges a state law requiring doctors providing abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. It’s the second suit challenging the state’s abortion restrictions filed this week. The US Supreme Court has says it will hear the case of a Tulsa Muslim teenager who was denied a job at an Abercrombie & Fitch because they said her hijab violated the chain’s employee dress code. State Rep. John Bennet (R-Sallisaw) doubled down on recent anti-Muslim comments on Thursday, suggesting that American Muslims lied when they condemned violence done by extremists.

NewsOK spoke with an attorney specializing in health law about the more restrictive reclassification of commonly-prescribed (and frequently abused) painkillers such as Lortab and Vicodin. We’ve written about painkiller addiction in Oklahoma before. The attorney for Oklahoma death row inmates argued that the drug cocktails allowed under revamped execution procedures have failed in other states, and shouldn’t be under consideration in Oklahoma. A rally at the state capitol on Thursday called for statewide criminal justice reform. You can see our suggestions for criminal justice reform here.

Pawnee Elementary’s new domed storm shelter has been declared ready for use. Walnut Creek State Park closed indefinitely last weekend due to shifting state budget priorities, and StateImpact spoke to the tourists and area businesspeople impacted. The Number of the Day is the percentage of income that renters in Oklahoma devoted to housing in 2013, up from 24.3 percent in 2000. In today’s Policy Note, Oxfam America explained why most businesspeople support raising the minimum wage.

continue reading In The Know: Dorman, Fallin meet in only debate

Upcoming Event: The 2014 Elections and the Future of Health Reform

by | October 2nd, 2014 | Posted in Blog, Healthcare, Upcoming Events | Comments (0)

poli-sci department u of mnOn Monday November 10th, Dr. Lawrence R. Jacobs, one of America’s foremost experts on health care policy, will give a lunchtime talk titled, “The 2014 Elections and the Future of Health Reform.” The talk, co-hosted by Oklahoma Policy Institute and the Oklahoma Scholars Strategy Network, will be will be held at the Jim Thorpe Association and Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame, 4040 N. Lincoln Blvd., Oklahoma City, beginning at 11:45 am. Tickets for this public event, which includes lunch (vegetarian options provided), are $15 and can be reserved online by clicking here.

continue reading Upcoming Event: The 2014 Elections and the Future of Health Reform

In The Know: Property rights group tells legislators Oklahoma wind farm tax credits are unsustainable

by and | October 2nd, 2014 | Posted in Blog, In The Know | Comments (1)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

A representative from the Oklahoma Property Rights Association told legislators that millions of dollars in Oklahoma tax subsidies are being given to wind power companies, and as the industry grows, this level of support is quickly becoming unsustainable. Shadow Mountain Behavioral Health System dedicated a new 36-bed hospital that will provide a much needed increase in mental health beds in the Tulsa area. David Blatt’s Journal Record column discussed the chances of Oklahoma making real corrections reforms to stop the crisis in our state’s prisons and jails. The Oklahoman editorial board argued that a recent murder in Moore may make sensible reforms a tougher sell.

A group of educators urged lawmakers Wednesday to stop the high-stakes testing of children with significant learning disabilities. The okeducationtruths blog discussed what Oklahoma may do now that CTB/McGraw-Hill has withdrawn from the bidding process to conduct winter testing. Superintendent Rob Neu and Associate Superintendent Aurora Lora spoke about the challenges facing Oklahoma City Public Schools at a community forum sponsored by Oklahoma Watch. A new report reveals nearly 500 Green Country schools are in close proximity to chemical plants, putting students at risk in the event of a chemical catastrophe. On the OK Policy Blog, we discussed why the lottery hasn’t solved Oklahoma’s education funding problems.

A new study by Ibis Reproductive Health found that states with the highest number of abortion restrictions also have the fewest policies in place to support women and children’s health and well-being. Oklahoma scored highest for abortion restrictions and lowest in the nation for supporting women and children’s well-being. A new report by Standard & Poor’s finds that extreme income inequality is contributing to state and local budget shortfalls. The OK Policy Blog previously discussed why the extreme levels of inequality that have developed in the U.S. are bad for business.

A monthly economic survey index for nine Midwestern and Plains states suggests economic growth in the region will slow down in the months ahead due to a drop in grain prices. A drier than normal September has diminished drought recovery in Oklahoma, and weather experts say the dry pattern will continue through October. The Number of the Day is how many critical access hospitals are in Oklahoma. These hospitals are typically small and rural, and the only acute-care option in isolated areas. In today’s Policy Note, the Associated Press reports on how aggressive spending on education by wealthy parents is widening inequality.

continue reading In The Know: Property rights group tells legislators Oklahoma wind farm tax credits are unsustainable

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