Using data from the American Housing Survey, this analysis highlights how both the built environment of a physical space and differential access to quality public services affect household and neighborhood health.  While the results reveal differences in the environmental quality of individual housing units and neighborhoods, they also offer much broader lessons on how the construction of our community at large implicates health. 

Many of our individual choices and behaviors are heavily mediated by factors beyond our control.  Health care, outreach, and education have benefits that are limited by physical components of our built environment.  The results also reveal the lasting material effects of housing and neighborhood segregation by race and income.

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This presentation was given at an Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign (OHEC) meeting.