All articles by Gene Perry

In The Know: Lawmakers defend tax cut as Oklahoma Supreme Court considers legal challenge

by | November 21st, 2014 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

A group of Oklahoma lawmakers released a statement defending passage of an income-tax cut that is under review by the Oklahoma Supreme Court. OK Policy previously discussed how the Supreme Court decision could dramatically change the politics around tax cuts in Oklahoma. Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear his case against federal health insurance subsidies at the same time justices consider a similar challenge from Virginia. If AG Pruitt’s lawsuit is successful, at least 55,000 Oklahomans could lose access to affordable coverage.

NewsOK shared the story of an Oklahoma City woman who is hoping for a path to legal work and residency by President Obama’s immigration executive action. Oklahoma Sen. Tom Coburn predicted a violent reaction to the President’s announcement. Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt said he is planning another lawsuit against the federal government over it. A group of Republican business owners in Oklahoma and Republican state Sen. Brian Crain called on Congress to pass an immigration bill that includes a path to legal status for some of the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the country.

Oklahoma City Public Schools kicked off a six month planning process to identify the most important issues the district will face over the next several years. In the Tulsa World, Kara Gae Neal described public education as the largest, overburdened, under-incentivized business in the state. A group of charitable foundations is meeting to come up with a plan to keep a Tulsa-area youthful offender center open through June. The group will seek to find short-term “bridge funding” to keep the facility open, but a long-term solution will require reversing state budget cuts. Bill Moyers reported that an Oklahoma City is running a food drive to help its own impoverished workers get through the holidays.

The Oklahoma State Department of Health will receive a $1.15 million federal grant to gather data on homicides and suicides in an effort to prevent those deaths. Oklahomans, particularly families with children, were more negative about the economy in October than their neighbors in Missouri and Arkansas, according to the Arvest Consumer Sentiment Survey. The Number of the Day is the total value of all goods traded between Oklahoma City and Tulsa in 2010. Both cities were each other’s second largest trading partner among major cities, with Dallas, TX as the largest trading partner. In today’s Policy Note, Vox explains what’s in President Obama’s new immigration plan.

continue reading In The Know: Lawmakers defend tax cut as Oklahoma Supreme Court considers legal challenge

To help kids, help parents

by | November 17th, 2014 | Posted in Blog, Children and Families, Poverty | Comments (0)
mother and child

Photo by Rolands Lakis.

About 168,000 children age 5 and younger in Oklahoma live in low-income families (making less than 200 percent of the poverty threshold, or $47,000 for a family of four). Like most families in America, the parents of these young children must juggle the demands of work, child care, school, and family time. Yet balancing those priorities can be impossible for parents without affordable child care, a predictable work schedule, or dependable transportation. The lack of a stable and enriching environment for kids in this crucial time in their lives can block the path out of poverty and lead to lifelong difficulties. Of those 168,000 children, 31 percent had parents expressing concern that their child was experiencing developmental delays.

These challenges are the focus of a new policy report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, “Creating Opportunity for Families: A two-generation approach.” 

continue reading To help kids, help parents

OK PolicyCast Episode 14: Do you know where your electricity comes from?

by | November 14th, 2014 | Posted in Podcast | Comments (0)

radio micYou can subscribe to the podcast on iTunesStitcher, or RSS. The podcast theme music is by Zébre.

This week, we’ll share a clip from OK Policy’s Summer Policy Institute last August. The Oklahoma Sustainability Network’s Montelle Clarke gave a balanced, informative talk on the pros and cons of Oklahoma’s various energy sources – including coal, natural gas, geothermal, and wind energy.

You can download this week’s episode here or play it in your browser:

In The Know: Health Insurance enrollment begins Saturday on healthcare.gov

by and | November 13th, 2014 | Posted in Blog, In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

The annual sign up window to buy health insurance through Healthcare.Gov begins this Saturday. Customers can already compare plans and prices being offered for 2015. Last we explained why it’s worth it to get coverage. A 4.8 magnitude earthquake centered in south-central Kansas was felt across Oklahoma yesterday. The Oklahoma State Election Board on Wednesday certified the election of U.S. Rep. Markwayne Mullin, ruling that Oklahoma does not need to conduct a special election for the seat even though Rep. Mullin’s Democratic opponent died two days before the election. The Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled that a lesbian woman who helped raise her partner’s two biological children is entitled to a court hearing on her claim for parental rights. You can read the full ruling here.

David Blatt’s Journal Record column discussed signs that Oklahomans seem to have given up on state politics. Nationwide, last week’s midterm elections saw the lowest turnout in 72 years. The Oklahoman Editorial Board weighed in on OK Policy’s recommendations to restore health to our democracy. On the OK Policy Blog, we gave suggestions for an agenda in Gov. Mary Fallin’s second term, following an election where she said almost nothing about what she would do.

A new report on early childhood development estimates that nearly a quarter of a million children in Oklahoma were living in poverty in 2012. You can read the full report here. The Inasmuch Foundation has given $1 million to the KIPP Reach College Preparatory charter school in Oklahoma City to expand with four new schools. School administrators told a legislative study that the state’s shortage of teachers has become a “scary” situation. House Speaker expressed frustration at foot-dragging by the State Board of Education on developing school standards to replace Common Core. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard said about 25 percent of Tulsa Public Schools’ next bond package could be dedicated to bolstering classroom technology.

Vox discussed how Oklahoma conservative billionaire Harold Hamm has taken to arguing that he made his fortune through luck to avoid a large divorce settlement. Several county sheriffs in Oklahoma have begun selling e-cigarettes to inmates to help fund their jails. The Tulsa World discussed how state budget cuts are set to eliminate important juvenile justice services and make government more inefficient. A new study found that many Indian Health Service facilities are still putting an age limit on who can purchase Plan B contraception, even though that violates federal law. A report from a civil rights group says the city of Norman ranks higher than the national average and best in Oklahoma for supporting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights. You can see the full report here.

The Number of the Day is poverty rate for African-Americans in Oklahoma, nearly double the white poverty rate. In today’s Policy Note, the Chronicle of Higher Education discusses how complicated financial-aid jargon is a barrier to college access, especially for first-generation college students.

continue reading In The Know: Health Insurance enrollment begins Saturday on healthcare.gov

In The Know: Oklahoma economists eye slumping oil prices

by and | November 12th, 2014 | Posted in Blog, In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Crude oil prices have plummeted to the lowest level in three years, and economists and state finance officials are concerned due to the Oklahoma economy’s heavy dependence on oil drilling. The average price of gasoline is down by nearly 15 cents per gallon across Oklahoma since last week. An automobile parts manufacturer said it will close its Oklahoma City plant next year, eliminating 165 jobs. The factory had received almost $900,000 in Quality Jobs Payments from the state since 2007 to create new jobs at the plant, but the program doesn’t include provisions that require companies to repay the incentives if workers later lose their jobs. An OK Policy report has examined the rapidly growing cost and gaps in oversight of the Quality Jobs Programs.

The Oklahoma State Election Board will meet behind closed doors today to discuss whether a special election should be called in the 2nd Congressional District. Suzan Harjo, an Oklahoma native who has spent decades advocating for Indian rights and dignity, is among those who will receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, later this month. Former Oklahoma House Speaker and U.S. Senate candidate T.W. Shannon has taken a job with a financial services firm in Tulsa. The New York Times examined the revival of downtown Tulsa.

On the OK Policy Blog, we describe how the U.S. Postal Service could return to profitability while meeting a huge need for banking services in many Oklahoma communities. By Tuesday morning, all 14 of an Oklahoma City homeless shelter’s makeshift cold-weather beds are full, but there were many more homeless people with no refuge from the wintry weather. OK Policy shared the slides from a presentation by Dr. Lawrence Jacobs about the future of the Affordable Care Act in the aftermath of recent elections. 

Oklahoma is in compliance with a national standard for ozone in 2014, after exceeding the standard in 2011 and 2012. The Salvation Army is expanding its ACT Prep Program for students in the Tulsa metro area. In a narrow victory that required a manual recount, a Republican has being elected to the Carter County Board of Commissioners for the first time since 1922. Amid a fourth consecutive year of drought, the cotton harvest has begun in southwest Oklahoma. A new Oklahoma law effective this month says that no governmental entity can have the final say on a parent’s right to make what he or she feels is the best decision for their child’s physical and mental health and educational upbringing.

The Number of the Day is how many children found to be victims of abuse and/or neglect in Oklahoma in 2013. In today’s Policy Note, NPR looked at how a program that doubles food stamp benefits when purchasing local fruits and vegetables has proved remarkably popular and spread across the country.

continue reading In The Know: Oklahoma economists eye slumping oil prices

In The Know: Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm ordered to pay $995 million in divorce

by and | November 11th, 2014 | Posted in Blog, In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Continental Resources Chief Executive Officer Harold Hamm has been ordered to pay nearly $1 billion to his ex-wife in one of the largest-ever U.S. divorce judgments. The award is far smaller than the amount lawyers for Sue Ann Hamm sought and does not require Harold Hamm to sell shares of Continental. The Oklahoma Democratic Party has selected Jerry Ellis, an outgoing state senator from Valliant, as the party’s candidate in a possible special election for the 2nd Congressional District seat in eastern Oklahoma. On the OK Policy Blog, we discussed how after last week’s elections the number of women and people of color in the Oklahoma Legislature will fall even lower.

Oklahoma highway officials say they’re preparing for a series of weather systems that forecasters predict will bring sub-freezing temperatures and a chance of snow to the state. An estimated 3,400 children who attend elementary school in the Oklahoma City district still need winter coats, and a fundraising effort by the district is still about $68,000 short. A bond issue for Guthrie Public Schools gained majority support but fell short of the 60 percent of votes needed to pass. The district has a history of failed bond elections, and officials had already scaled back this bond proposal significantly, with most of the money going toward fixing leaky roofs. Beginning the 2015-2016 school year, a new state law requires high school students to receive CPR training in order to graduate.

A program that’s taken more than 6,000 juvenile offenders off the hands of police officers since 2010 will likely close March 1 when it runs out of money due to state budget cuts. Oklahoma County and the state Corrections Department have begun a pilot program to submitted sentencing information electronically from the court house to prison staff. Kansas is looking at an additional hundreds of millions in budget cuts over the next two years due to the continuing effect of large income tax cuts, and the state’s economy continues to lag behind nationwide growth.

The efforts in Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, will likely subside in the coming years, replaced by conversations at a state and federal level on how to improve the federal health care law, a policy expert told a crowd of policymakers and health leaders Monday. Tulsa’s sales tax revenues are showing continued growth above budget projections — a stark contrast to the previous fiscal year. An appeals court Monday overturned a court order that halted construction of a casino in Broken Arrow. Legislators are exploring a variety of options to come up with about $40 million in state funding that’s needed to complete the Native American Cultural Center and Museum.

The Number of the Day is how much federal funds would be invested in Oklahoma for every $1 of state money spent if the state were to expand health coverage to low-income Oklahomans. In today’s Policy Note, the New York Times examines the rewards and the remaining stigma of paternity leave.

continue reading In The Know: Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm ordered to pay $995 million in divorce

In The Know: Rep. Jeff Hickman reaffirmed as House Speaker

by | November 10th, 2014 | Posted in Blog, In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

 The House Republican Caucus on Friday reaffirmed Rep. Jeff Hickman as speaker-elect.  The caucus also tapped Rep. Lee Denney, R-Cushing, as speaker pro tempore-elect. The Oklahoma Democratic Party selected three potential candidates Saturday for a proposed special election in Oklahoma’s 2nd Congressional District. State Democrats are asking for a special election for the seat because the Democratic candidate died in a car accident just days before the election. NewsOK reported that traditionally Republican Oklahoma County reported some of the best results for Democrats in this year’s election, while the former Democratic strongholds in southeast Oklahoma are turning more Republican.

On the latest OK PolicyCast, we analyze the election with OK Policy Director David Blatt. NewsOK reported that the 32 newly elected state representatives and senators come from a diverse range of professions, a change from days when most state legislators were attorneys. KGOU shared a list of the many state officials who took office without any opposition in the general election. Over the past five years, fewer and fewer Oklahoma communities are adding fluoride to their water, largely due to cost, a trend that concerns public health officials as the state’s dental health lags. The approval of minimum wage increases by large popular vote margins in several red states and is putting more scrutiny Oklahoma lawmakers’ decision to ban local minimum wage increases.

Superintendent-elect Joy Hofmeister said she wants to develop an eight-year plan to create a dedicated funding source to improve teacher pay. Susan Ellerbach — the managing editor of the Tulsa World since 1995 — has become the newspaper’s new executive editor, making her the first woman to ever lead the World’s newsroom. Chesapeake Energy Corp. has received subpoenas from federal and state authorities that are investigating the company’s royalty payment practices. As more states approve the medicinal and recreational use of marijuana, an Oklahoma-based company is looking to build a national franchise with cannabis e-cigarettes.

A Tulsa World investigation found that the annual number of people fatally shot by Oklahoma law enforcement officers has tripled since 2009, and all but one of the shootings were ruled justified. More than six months after Clayton Lockett’s execution drew international scrutiny, the Oklahoma Department of Corrections has released related emails requested by the Tulsa World. Gov. Mary Fallin’s office and the state Department of Public Safety still have not complied with the World’s open records requests. The Tulsa City Council discussed examples of improper spending by the Tulsa County Sheriff’s office, leaving at least two councilors adamant that the office be audited.

The Number of the Day is how much Oklahoma’s spending on incarceration increased from 1986 to 2013. In today’s Policy Note, the New York Times shares data showing exactly how many Americans have been denied health insurance by the US Supreme Court’s decision to make Medicaid expansion optional and states’ refusals to accept the expansion.

continue reading In The Know: Rep. Jeff Hickman reaffirmed as House Speaker

OK PolicyCast Episode 13: Analyzing the Elections

by | November 7th, 2014 | Posted in Podcast | Comments (0)

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunesStitcher, or RSS. The podcast theme music is by Zébre.

radio micEach week the OK PolicyCast brings you the most important news affecting Oklahoma and what it means. This week, we speak with David Blatt about what this week’s elections mean for Oklahoma and the nation. We also share some non-election related news for the week.

You can download the episode here or play it in your browser:

In The Know: Oklahoma voter turnout in governor’s race is lowest on record

by and | November 6th, 2014 | Posted in Blog, In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Voter turnout in Oklahoma’s election Tuesday was possibly the lowest on record in a state gubernatorial election, according to an analysis of state voting data by Oklahoma Watch. Ervin Yen, the newly elected State Senator for District 40, will become the first Asian-American in the Oklahoma state legislature. David Blatt’s Journal Record column suggests an agenda for Gov. Mary Fallin’s second term, following a reelection campaign in which she said almost nothing about what she would do. Oklahoma’s Congressional delegation said they are ready to work with President Barack Obama on issues such as road building, the Keystone pipeline, foreign trade, financial reform and U.S. military actions in Syria.

A group home for juvenile offenders in Custer County will close after four years because runaways are causing concerns in the community. The deadline for a threatened takeover of the Oklahoma County jail passed Wednesday without a word from the U.S. Department of Justice. A 2009 agreement had given the jail five years to make changes to end civil rights abuses. Oklahoma’s Secretary of Veterans Affairs Rita Aragon suffered a “mini stroke” Tuesday and has been hospitalized. Oklahoma’s state treasurer says falling crude oil prices could darken an otherwise bright revenue picture for the state.

On the OK Policy Blog, we discussed why Oklahomans should get flu shots. Now that the election’s over, Tulsa’s Metropolitan Environmental Trust Director Michael Patton discussed the best way to dispose of campaign signs. OK Policy’s David Blatt will be among the honorees at the inaugural Dan Allen Social Justice Awards tonight. The city of Denton, Texas voted to ban fracking on Tuesday due to concerns about pollution of drinking water, but a state agency is attempting to override the ban.

The Number of the Day is the average amount of money saved, in medical expenses and lost productivity, for each suicide prevented in Oklahoma. In today’s Policy Note, the New York Times reports that only 11 percent of uninsured Americans know about the Affordable Care Act’s next open enrollment period beginning November 15.

continue reading In The Know: Oklahoma voter turnout in governor’s race is lowest on record

In The Know: GOP sweeps all state offices, grows majority in Senate

by and | November 5th, 2014 | Posted in Blog, In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Gov. Mary Fallin won a second term yesterday, defeating Democratic state Rep. Joe Dorman in another GOP sweep of all statewide offices. Republicans also increased their majority in the state Senate by four seats. You can see Oklahoma’s statewide and federal election results here and local results here. Joy Hofmeister pulled away from rural educator John Cox to become Oklahoma’s next superintendent of public instruction. U.S. Rep Markwayne Mullin easily won reelection last night, but he might have to face another election because his Democratic opponent died from injuries in a car accident before the election. State law may allow parties to replace deceased candidates, even if it requires a special election. Republican Steve Russell captured the congressional seat representing Oklahoma City. He’s the first Oklahoma Congressman, at least in recent history, that didn’t actually live in the district when he was elected.

Oklahoma voters on Tuesday handily approved three state questions designed to clarify and expand laws related to military personnel and veterans. OK Policy previously examined SQ 769, which allows military guard members to hold elected office, and SQs 770 and 771, which expand property tax breaks for some veterans and their families. On the OK Policy Blog, we looked at reasons behind why Oklahomans are voting at some of the lowest levels in the nation. The Oklahoma Supreme Court put on hold two new laws that would make it more difficult for women to obtain abortions in the state. All state Supreme Court members were retained in office in yesterday’s elections.

Two energy sector companies may get up to $15.7 million in incentive payments through the state’s Quality Jobs Program over the next 10 years. An OK Policy report previously discussed concerns about the growing cost and gaps in oversight of this program. Six more counts have been filed against an Oklahoma City police officer after three more reported victims, including a 17-year-old girl, have come forth alleging he forced them to commit sex acts while he was on duty. NewsOK reported on how an Oklahoma man accused of damaging Ten Commandments monument has struggled with mental illness. Religion Dispatches discussed why Oklahoma’s two recent beheading murders by a “Muslim” and a “Christian” should challenge our narratives around religion and violence.

The Number of the Day is how many fewer Oklahomans voted in this year’s governor’s race compared to 2010, a 20 percent drop in turnout. In today’s Policy Note, The American Prospect looks at the red states that approved minimum wage increase ballot initiatives last night.

continue reading In The Know: GOP sweeps all state offices, grows majority in Senate

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