Skip to Content

All articles by Gene Perry

In The Know: Oklahoma labor commissioner murdered in OKC

by | August 24th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is your daily briefing on Oklahoma policy-related news. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. Click here to subscribe to In The Know and see past editions.

Today In The News

Oklahoma labor commissioner stabbed to death in OKC: State Labor Commissioner Mark Costello was stabbed to death Sunday night at a northwest Oklahoma City restaurant in what sources say was an attempted reconciliation gone bad with his son. Costello’s son, Christian Costello, 26, was taken into police custody and was being questioned by detectives late Sunday [NewsOK].

Lawmakers debate funding sources for teacher pay raises: Facing tight budgets and demands from Oklahoma teachers for their first across-the-board pay increase in years, lawmakers are suggesting non-traditional funding sources, much to the displeasure of those now using these funds. Rep. Steve Kouplen, D-Beggs, calls it “robbing Peter to pay Paul” [NewsOK].

OKC Public Schools proposes to offer PSAT test to more grades: The district paid for 2,800 sophomores and juniors to take the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test in the spring. When the school board meets Aug. 31, it will consider a district recommendation to spend about $77,500 to expand this year’s offerings to include eighth- and ninth-graders [NewsOK].

continue reading In The Know: Oklahoma labor commissioner murdered in OKC

In The Know: State ranks high for Affordable Care Act sign-ups in special enrollment period

by | August 19th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is your daily briefing on Oklahoma policy-related news. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. Click here to subscribe to In The Know and see past editions.

Today In The News

State ranks high for Affordable Care Act sign-ups in special enrollment period: Nearly 11,500 Oklahomans who lost health insurance or were denied Medicaid benefits in the last year signed up for health insurance plans through a federal exchange, according to data released by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. A higher percentage of Oklahomans with special circumstances bought plans on the federally run insurance exchange than the national average, according to CMS. Those who have lost a job, weren’t eligible for Medicaid, got married or had a baby or other special life circumstances can buy insurance before the open enrollment period begins in November [Journal Record].

Evaluating a carbon tax for Oklahoma: While economists have long endorsed a carbon tax as an economically efficient way to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, the idea hasn’t receive much political support. However, a growing number of voices from across the political spectrum have begun to endorse the idea of putting a price on carbon. As pressure increases in states and nationally to come up with a better policy response to climate change, does a carbon tax make sense for a politically conservative, oil-and-gas dependent state like Oklahoma? [OK Policy]

Oklahoma teacher unions file lawsuit to overturn new Oklahoma law: A lawsuit filed Tuesday in Oklahoma County District Court seeks to overturn a new law that prohibits teachers from allowing union dues to be automatically deducted from their paychecks. The Oklahoma Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers Oklahoma filed the lawsuit, along with one member from each organization [NewsOK]. In debate on the House floor, opponents of the bill said it was really intended to punish the Oklahoma Education Association for opposing school choice [OK Policy].

continue reading In The Know: State ranks high for Affordable Care Act sign-ups in special enrollment period

In The Know: Credit agency says oil industry-linked earthquakes threaten economy

by | August 18th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is your daily briefing on Oklahoma policy-related news. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. Click here to subscribe to In The Know and see past editions.

Today In The News

Credit agency says oil industry-linked earthquakes threaten economy: Analysts with Standard and Poor’s said the seismic activity may be a liability for energy companies and the oil and gas industry, and the credit risk could also affect home and business owners, transportation, infrastructure and utilities [StateImpact Oklahoma]. You read the full report from Standard and Poor’s here.

Oklahomans with disabilities say finding affordable housing is a challenge: Any time Veldon Gray needs to leave his home, his wife, Betty Gray, must try to navigate him and his wheelchair down the steps of the couple’s Oklahoma City apartment. Veldon Gray, 76, and his wheelchair together weigh about 215 pounds, not an easy load for Betty, 67, who has a pain pump in her back for degenerative discs. Advocates say the Grays’ situation points to a larger problem: the shortage of affordable housing for residents with disabilities [NewsOK].

Interactive – What the jobs are in Oklahoma: Politicians love to talk about jobs. Promoting job creation is a go-to justification in many of Oklahoma’s policy decisions, whether it’s to extend tax breaks for oil companies or ban local minimum wage and paid sick leave laws. However, aside from talking about job creation in very broad strokes, we don’t hear much discussion about what the jobs actually are in Oklahoma. In a new interactive visualization, you can dive into what jobs Oklahomans are working and how much they earn by industry [OK Policy].

continue reading In The Know: Credit agency says oil industry-linked earthquakes threaten economy

Interactive: What the jobs are in Oklahoma

by | August 17th, 2015 | Posted in Blog, Economy, Education, Financial Security | Comments (1)

Politicians love to talk about jobs. Promoting job creation is a go-to justification in many of Oklahoma’s policy decisions, whether it’s to extend tax breaks for oil companies or ban local minimum wage and paid sick leave laws.

However, aside from talking about job creation in very broad strokes, we don’t hear much discussion about what the jobs actually are in Oklahoma. That’s not for lack of data. Quarterly economic surveys by the U.S. Census give us a detailed portrait of where Oklahomans are working and what they earn by industry. These numbers may correct some popular misconceptions about Oklahoma’s economy.

continue reading Interactive: What the jobs are in Oklahoma

In The Know: Oklahoma teacher shortage crisis grows

by | August 17th, 2015 | Posted in Blog, In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is your daily briefing on Oklahoma policy-related news. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. Click here to subscribe to In The Know and see past editions.

Today In The News

Crisis hits Oklahoma classrooms with teacher shortage, quality concerns: Oklahoma’s deepening teacher shortage has education officials trading in their “Help Wanted” signs for ones with a more urgent message: “Help Needed NOW.” As schools ring in the start of a new academic year, administrators are desperately trying to fill teacher vacancies amid a scarcity of applicants [Tulsa World].

Oklahoma City school district begins discipline intervention training: The district is attempting to dig out from under one of the nation’s highest suspension rates and an investigation by the U.S. Department of Education’s civil rights division. A district audit found the school system suspends minorities at a much higher rate than white students, inconsistently punishes students for similar offenses and suffers from missing paperwork and rampant record-keeping discrepancies [NewsOK].

Thorny questions on role of law enforcement in schools: You can probably look for some attention to the issue of school discipline next session in the wake of a lawsuit filed in Kentucky after a “school resource officer” handcuffed an 8-year old, 52-pound boy. In Oklahoma use of mechanical restraints is regulated by statute in various juvenile and mental health facilities, but I found nothing in the school code or regulations dealing with the situation [OK Policy].

continue reading In The Know: Oklahoma teacher shortage crisis grows

In The Know: Deadline arrives for earthquake-linked injection wells to install monitoring equipment

by | August 14th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (1)

In The KnowIn The Know is your daily briefing on Oklahoma policy-related news. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. Click here to subscribe to In The Know and see past editions.

Today In The News

Today is deadline for earthquake-linked injection wells to install monitoring equipment: Friday will mark the first of four deadlines for certain wastewater injection well operators in Oklahoma and Logan Counties as the State Corporation Commission attempts to reduce the risk of earthquakes potentially triggered by them. The operators are required to have gauges and flow meters in place by today so that Commission Field Inspectors can verify pressues and volumes [OK Energy Today].

Drought returns in southeast Oklahoma: The newest drought area makes up only 1.32 percent of the state. At the same time, the latest Drought Monitor showed a spreading area of abnormally dry conditions in the southeast and now 9 counties fall under the condition or 12.04 percent of the state [OK Energy Today].

Samson Resources expected to file bankruptcy soon: Tulsa-based Samson is more than $4 billion in debt. The company must pay a $110 million interest payment on its bonds Aug. 15, but according to a story from Business Insider, Samson “doesn’t have the money, can’t pay, and won’t pay.” After recent layoffs, the company employs fewer than 400 people in Tulsa [Tulsa World].

continue reading In The Know: Deadline arrives for earthquake-linked injection wells to install monitoring equipment

Watch This: Causes and Consequences of the Growth of Incarceration in the United States

by | August 13th, 2015 | Posted in Criminal Justice, Watch This | Comments (1)

After decades of stability from the 1920s to the early 1970s, the rate of imprisonment in the United States more than quadrupled during the last four decades. A recent report from the National Research Council, The Growth of Incarceration in the United States, examines what’s behind this dramatic rise of incarceration.

The study reviews decades of research on incarceration and finds that the United States has gone far past the point where the numbers of people in prison can be justified by social benefits. It finds that these high incarceration rates have themselves become a source of injustice and social harm. This short video summarizes the study and what we can do to improve criminal justice policies.

In The Know: Oklahoma cuts health care for aged, blind, and disabled

by | August 13th, 2015 | Posted in Blog, In The Know | Comments (1)

In The KnowIn The Know is your daily briefing on Oklahoma policy-related news. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. Click here to subscribe to In The Know and see past editions.

Today In The News

Oklahoma cuts health care for aged, blind, and disabled: The Oklahoma Health Care Authority board went ahead and approved the 3.5 percent rate cut for developmental disabilities service providers. The action will reduce spending on the programs by $11 million. including about $7 million in federal funds and $4 million in state funds. The Health Care Authority also approved a $5 million cut for health care providers who serve aged, blind and disabled Oklahomans [Oklahoma Watch].

Oklahoma voter turnout hits all-time lows: Every two years, the U.S. Census Bureau issues a report on voter participation in the most recent elections based on a national survey conducted the previous November. The news from this year’s report ain’t pretty. Fewer Americans voted in the 2104 midterm elections than in any election in at least 45 years. In Oklahoma, barely one out of three adults (34.2 percent) went to the polls [OK Policy].

No home for Oklahomans with felony records: Locating affordable housing is one of the toughest barriers for Oklahomans with a past felony conviction. Homelessness surveys and anecdotal reports from re-entry programs indicate that inadequate access to housing is a substantial hardship for ex-prisoners [David Blatt / Journal Record]. Oklahoma’s major public housing assistance programs frequently exclude people with felony records, and even those who have been arrested without being charged, from getting help [OK Policy].

continue reading In The Know: Oklahoma cuts health care for aged, blind, and disabled

In The Know: Fallin says innocence claims won’t delay execution

by | August 12th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is your daily briefing on Oklahoma policy-related news. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. Click here to subscribe to In The Know and see past editions.

Today In The News

Governor Fallin says innocence claims won’t delay scheduled execution: Fallin said in a statement that she is convinced Richard Eugene Glossip is guilty in the beating death of motel owner Barry Van Treese and that the state is prepared to move forward with his Sept. 16 execution [Washington Post]. Actress Susan Sarandon has joined death penalty opponent Sister Helen Prejean in an effort to halt the execution, and both debated Gov. Fallin’s spokemans Alex Weintz on Twitter [KFOR].

Is the state refusing to provide oversight on insurer rate hikes to score political points against Obamacare? Affordable Care Act health insurance rates are expected to rise in Oklahoma in 2016, and the state Insurance Department insists it cannot do anything about rates except review and approve the paperwork. In the past, however, the department held a somewhat different view, according to a former high-ranking state insurance official [Oklahoma Watch].

State backs off questions about tribes’ electronic games: After hearing no response from the federal government, Oklahoma’s Gaming Compliance Unit has backed off its questions about whether tribes are using improperly authorized casino machines. In June, GCU’s deputy director wrote to a federal official with concerns that some electronic games used in casinos were never officially authorized under the compact that allowed gaming in Oklahoma [Journal Record].

continue reading In The Know: Fallin says innocence claims won’t delay execution

In The Know: Judge strikes down Oklahoma law restricting abortion drugs

by | August 11th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is your daily briefing on Oklahoma policy-related news. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. Click here to subscribe to In The Know and see past editions.

Today In The News

Judge strikes down Oklahoma law restricting abortion drugs: District Judge Patricia Parrish found that a rule requiring doctors to follow label instructions when prescribing abortion-inducing drugs is unconstitutional because it doesn’t apply to other kinds of medication [Associated Press].

Judge halts new regulations on Osage County oil production: Groups representing the Osage Nation and oil producers operating in Osage County sued the federal government in early July, claiming new rules about to take effect would lead to decreased production and royalties and effectively kill the oil industry in the county [Tulsa World].

Petitioners seek to stop Cherokee hunting-fishing compact with Oklahoma: If they can collect 1,000 signatures, a group of Cherokee Nation citizens could delay a hunting and fishing compact recently signed with the state of Oklahoma. Claiming their sovereignty has been sold out, the group is circulating a petition asking for a full up-or-down vote on the compact [Tulsa World].

continue reading In The Know: Judge strikes down Oklahoma law restricting abortion drugs

  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. ...
  10. 114