In The Know: Thousands rally at Oklahoma Capitol for education funding

by | March 31st, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Thousands of educators, parents and schoolchildren rallied at the state Capitol on Monday seeking restored funding for public schools. Speakers at the rally said lawmakers had ignored the demands of last year’s education rally. For the second year in a row, Gov. Mary Fallin was absent from the state Capitol during the rally. On the OK Policy Blog, we made the case for halting a scheduled tax cut that is adding more than $50 million to next year’s budget shortfall and was never meant to take effect in these conditions.

A lawsuit now before the Oklahoma Supreme Court will decide if energy companies can be forced to pay for damages from earthquakes that are linked to oil-and-gas activity. StateImpact Oklahoma discussed evidence that University of Oklahoma President David Boren and Continental Resources Chairman Harold Hamm had sought to intimidate a geologist investigating the link between earthquakes and the energy industry. In a response much different from Oklahoma’s, Kansas officials declared earthquakes in two counties “an immediate threat to public health, safety and welfare” and ordered dramatic reductions in the volume of oil- and gas-production wastewater being injected underground.

A legislative committee declined to support a bill that would require notification of the state Board of Education when a teacher is fired after being accused of a crime. State Treasurer Ken Miller has announced an initiative to bring a Web-based financial education program to high school students across the state through a partnership with private company EverFi. An Oklahoma City “dinner club” is fighting a cease and desist order from the state Health Department, which stated the club’s owners were operating without a license as a food establishment.

OU President Boren said members of a University of Oklahoma fraternity apparently learned a racist chant that recently got their chapter disbanded during a cruise that was sponsored by the fraternity’s national administration. The fraternity’s national president criticized Boren in a letter posted on Facebook. The US Justice Department is suing Southeastern Oklahoma State University on behalf of a transgender woman fired from her teaching job after an administrator said her “lifestyle” offended him.

The Number of the Day is the percentage of Oklahoma’s 77 counties that saw population growth between 2013 and 2014. In today’s Policy Note, the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities shows that in four out of five states with major income tax cuts in recent years, private-sector job growth has been slower than in the U.S. as a whole.

continue reading In The Know: Thousands rally at Oklahoma Capitol for education funding

In The Know: Oklahoma education advocates rally at the Capitol today

by | March 30th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (1)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Today, thousands of Oklahoma teachers, administrators, parents and students will rally at the Capitol in support of better teacher compensation and a stronger teacher pipeline. Writing in The Oklahoman, State Superintendent of Schools Joy Hofmeister called on lawmakers adopt her plan to put high-quality teachers in every classroom. The Tulsa World reported that polls show that 86 percent of Oklahomans support Hofmeister’s plan for teacher pay raises. Wayne Greene wrote in the Tulsa World that proposals to exempt educators from the state income tax would cost the state millions of dollars, and opens the door to other groups demanding similar exemptions.

A growing inmate population combined with difficulty hiring mental health professionals have led the state Department of Corrections to cut nearly half its group therapy sessions and offer fewer individual therapy sessions, resulting in fewer offenders receiving preventive mental health treatment. However, more offenders are receiving mental health services after release, due to a partnership between the Department of Corrections and Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Writing on the OK Policy Blog, Steve Lewis shared what’s left for the legislative session, now that it’s halfway through.

In the Tulsa World, Mike Jones discussed a viral video called “The Village is Burning,” which encourages more Oklahomans to get out and vote. You can watch the video here. Julie DelCour pointed out that more the number of people who voted in a recent Tulsa Public Schools bond election could fit in the BOK Center with room to spare, and urged lawmakers to pass reforms aimed at boosting electoral turnout. We’ve suggested ways to repair Oklahoma’s broken democracy before. Oklahoma’s mining and logging sector, which includes the oil and gas industry, lost 2,400 jobs in February – the worst month for the industry since 1990.

New Census Bureau data shows which Oklahoma counties have experienced population growth and loss from 2013 to 2014. According to new county health rankings, Kingfisher County is the healthiest in Oklahoma. You can read the report here. Proposed legislation would seek to develop policies to protect and promote the state’s declining honeybee population. The Number of the Day is the median income in Oklahoma in 2013, down from $46,025 in 2000 (adjusted for inflation). In today’s Policy Note, The Washington Post argues that underutlization of the School Breakfast Program means schools are failing students before they even get to class.

continue reading In The Know: Oklahoma education advocates rally at the Capitol today

In The Know: Bill banning automatic dues deduction for teachers to go before Governor.

by | March 27th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

A bill that would ban school districts from automatically deducting union dues from teachers’ paychecks (HB 1749) passed the Senate on Thursday and will next go before the Governor. We’ve previously argued that the bill is a funny way to support education. Because Tulsa Public Schools cancelled classes on Thursday following severe weather, the  district has reversed its decision to cancel classes on Monday to allow faculty and staff to attend Monday’s education rally at the Capitol, although TPS Superintendent Keith Ballard said that principals will work with staff members to allow a few per school to attend. School leaders are bracing for possible budget cuts this year, which they warn could lead to larger class sizes and fewer programs. We’ve shown before that Oklahoma’s school funding situation is even worse than you thought.

A guest post on the OK Policy Blog argues that voter fraud in American elections is a myth, and that the real threat to elections is that the myth of voter fraud is used to make voting more restrictive. A bill that would ban texting while driving has passed out of committee and is headed for the full Senate. A Senate panel also approved a bill that would prevent insurance companies from making it harder for patients to access proton radiation cancer therapy. A bill that would regulate homebuilders and commercial contractors passed a Senate committee, but some lawmakers complain that it invites government intrusion into business, even though the Oklahoma State Home Builders Association wants the bill. Morton Comprehensive Health Services has reversed a January decision and will now accept new uninsured patients, although the state funding problem that had prompted the January decision has not yet been solved. You can read more about how funding cuts threaten the state’s community health centers.

State officials have expanded the number of counties included in earthquake “areas of interest” and are now requiring companies to prove that their disposal wells are not too steep. StateImpact reports that a major oil storage hub in Cushing is nearly full, because the oil industry is storing crude oil rather than selling it at low prices. Experts estimate that a record 54 million barrels of oil are stored at the Cushing hub. Samson Resource Co., a Tulsa oil and gas giant, is laying off nearly 200 Tulsa workers and 270 company-wide.

OU journalism students and Oklahoma Watch, have launched “Talk With Us: Poverty in Oklahoma City Neighborhoods,” a  mobile video project. The project is available at talkwithus.net. The Number of the Day is the percentage of 25-34 years olds in the Oklahoma City metro area with a 4-year degree in 2012, up from 24.4% in 2000. In today’s Policy Note, NPR reports that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is preparing to unveil new rules to regulate payday lenders.

continue reading In The Know: Bill banning automatic dues deduction for teachers to go before Governor.

In The Know: Fallin emails undercut lawsuit against Obamacare

by and | March 26th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

A Huffington Post examination of more than 50,000 previously released emails from the Governor’s Fallin’s office, as well as record requests from multiple states and the Department of Health and Human Services, found that state officials did not once consider that if they chose not to run their own health care exchanges, their citizens would not be eligible for the tax credit subsidies. Nearly 100,000 Oklahomans could lose access to affordable health care if a Supreme Court case claiming the subsidies are only available on state exchanges succeeds. In a Tulsa World op-ed, OK Policy analyst Carly Putnam wrote that if Governor Fallin is serious about her goal of improving Oklahoma’s health, she needs to stop opposing affordable health insurance. On the OK Policy Blog, Carly discussed how Kansas is considering accepting federal funds to expand health coverage as a way to reduce the state’s budget shortfall.

The Tulsa World reported that after years of doing just about all it could to restrict voting, the Oklahoma Legislature is now trying to encourage it. Several of the proposals moving through the Legislature to encourage voter participation were recommended by OK Policy’s report on repairing Oklahoma’s broken democracy. A bill to move Oklahoma’s 2016 presidential primary back a month was laid over after running into stiff opposition in a House committee. A Senate panel on Thursday is now expected to take up a measure banning texting while driving.

The Senate Appropriations Committee questioned Oklahoma’s $2.9 million support for Amtrak service between Oklahoma City and Fort Worth. The Oklahoman editorial board defended the scheduled $59.7 million increase in roads funding next year that will bring Oklahoma’s annual off-the-top funding for roads to $472 million. NewsOK reported that numerous proposals from Democratic lawmakers died without getting a hearing in Republican-controlled committees, including a bill that could have produced $150 million in federal funds for Native American health care at no cost to the state.

Together Oklahoma is asking Oklahomans to contact lawmakers and ask them to halt an income tax cut scheduled for next years that is adding tens of millions to the state’s already large budget shortfall. A Together Oklahoma general meeting will be held next Thursday in Oklahoma. In the Journal Record, David Blatt encouraged Oklahomans to join the March 30 rally at the capitol in support of public education and good teachers. Tulsa World columnist Ginnie Graham wrote that if you don’t rally for education, then at least write a letter or make a call.

A review website ranked the Tulsa Union high school cafeteria fourth best out of nearly 4,000 districts across the country. The Delaware Tribe of Indians’ Tribal Council passed legislation to increase the minimum wage for the tribe’s employees to $1.25 more than the federal minimum. As earthquakes continue to surge in Oklahoma and seismologists warn of more frequent and more damaging shaking, the Oklahoma Corporation Commission is issuing new orders to companies operating wells in seismically active regions of the state. A former University of Oklahoma student captured on video leading a racist chant apologized Wednesday at a joint event with African-American community leaders.

The Number of the Day is the value of ornamental fish sold in Oklahoma in 2012. In today’s Policy Note, Mother Jones discusses how Utah has decreased the number of homeless by 72 percent—largely by finding and building apartments where they can live, permanently, with no strings attached.

continue reading In The Know: Fallin emails undercut lawsuit against Obamacare

In The Know: Questions surround state subsidies aimed at saving jobs

by and | March 25th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

An Oklahoma Watch investigated a state program that makes payments to private companies supposedly to save jobs, but a lack of transparency makes it virtually impossible for the public to verify claims that the jobs were really in danger of leaving Oklahoma. One company receiving these Quality Jobs payments is a long-time Enid employer. The extension of the Quality Jobs program to subsidizing existing companies began at the request of lobbyists for Tronox Inc., a spinoff of the Kerr-McGee Corp. that was created to take billions of dollars in legal liability for toxic waste sites off Kerr-McGee’s books before declaring bankruptcy. An OK Policy report previously examined the growing cost and lack of oversight of the Quality Jobs program.

Tulsa Public Schools has joined dozens of other school districts across the state in canceling classes on March 30 to allow teachers and other staff to attend an education rally at the state Capitol. On the OK Policy Blog, we found an Oklahoma senator’s press release about school consolidation and teacher salaries does not pass a fact check. A new study on payday lending in Oklahoma has uncovered evidence that high-interest lenders target economically distressed communities by opening storefronts in poorer areas and near military installations. Oklahoma Assets Network is hosting a town hall forum with the author of the study on April 15.

An OCU law professor wrote that a bill to put a two-year deadline for inmates to file petitions for post-conviction relief in Oklahoma would be great news for criminals who escape apprehension because an innocent person mistakenly has been arrested and convicted. Oklahoma would become the nation’s first state to allow the use of nitrogen gas to execute death-row inmates under legislation that has been approved by the House and is moving through the Senate. The Tulsa World reported that Oklahoma’s hospital network is in a precarious financial position due to various federal and state budget cuts to Medicare and Medicaid and the state’s refusal to accept expanded federal funding for Medicaid.

The author of a bill that changes a state program to ensure life insurance beneficiaries get payments complained the measure may die in committee because Senate Appropriations Chair Clark Jolley is predisposed against it. The Tulsa World wrote that we should be suspicious of ideas from the insurance industry to “improve” the program. Over the past decade, the Oklahoma Lottery Commission has collected about $500,000 in back taxes and unpaid child support from lottery winners. A request to put a monument to Lord Hanuman, a Hindu deity, on the Oklahoma Capitol grounds is still on hold.

The Number of the Day is the share of the vote cast by young people (between 18-29) in Oklahoma in 2012. In today’s Policy Note, the New York Times examined how a growing number of states are pre-empting the power of local governments, often at the request of industry lobbyists.

continue reading In The Know: Questions surround state subsidies aimed at saving jobs

In The Know: Oklahoma veterans agency chief investigator fired, accused of being fake police officer

by and | March 24th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

The chief investigator at the Oklahoma Veterans Affairs Department has been fired and is facing prosecution after authorities concluded he is a fraud. The only state facility for incarcerated juvenile girls could close this summer if additional funding isn’t obtained by the Office of Juvenile Affairs. Tulsa city and county officials seem to be inching closer to a jail agreement, but officials are still negotiating over which inmates should be the first to be released when the jail reaches capacity. The Tulsa World praised the package of criminal justice reform measures moving though the Legislature.

On the OK Policy Blog, we discussed how despite talk of the need for greater scrutiny of tax incentives, lawmakers are pushing another unproven tax break with no idea what it will cost. While still negotiating the language, the Oklahoma House of Representatives Common Education Committee kept alive education reform measures that would replace state-mandated end of instruction tests and extend a moratorium on automatic retention of third graders. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard announced Monday that he will be seeking school board approval to cancel classes on March 30 to allow teachers and other staff to attend an education rally at the state Capitol. 

A Senate committee approved legislation to prohibit the use of all tobacco products in public schools and make them tobacco free. Inside Higher Ed examined issues surrounding the University of Oklahoma’s treatment of American Indian students. The Cherokee Nation is distributing checks totaling $4 million from tribal car tag sales to 106 school districts. A bill that would require doctors to check a patient database before writing prescriptions for highly addictive drugs is one step away from the governor’s signature after passing a Senate committee.

The Journal Record editorial board argued that accepting federal funds to expand Medicaid would be good for business in Oklahoma. An OK Policy report previously examined the Medicaid expansion’s track record in other states. A man is preparing to take the matter to court after the Oklahoma Tax Commission denied a personalized license plate supporting gay rights with the message “LGBTALY,” claiming it is sexual in nature. Legislation that authorizes public schools to implement programs intended to help prevent child sexual abuse has been approved by an Oklahoma Senate committee, though lawmakers added protections for parents who opt their children out of this training program. Six years after the Legislature approved a Ten Commandments monument on the state Capitol, the state is still fighting legal action.

The Number of the Day is the percentage of Oklahoma City metro residents who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. In today’s Policy Note, NPR reports on why Americans with low incomes pay a price in poor health.

continue reading In The Know: Oklahoma veterans agency chief investigator fired, accused of being fake police officer

In The Know: Superintendent Hofmeister to join March 30 education rally

by and | March 23rd, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

A year after Oklahoma educators traveled to the state Capitol seeking more classroom funding and better salaries, teachers and their supporters plan to renew those demands with another massive Capitol rally, this time joined by State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister. Oklahoma gained one spot to claim the fourth lowest average teacher salary in the nation, not because teachers are earning significantly more, but because the average salary in Idaho went down. The okeducationtruths blog wrote that the Oklahoma Legislature’s attacks on education keep coming. Come next fall, school districts across the state will have the opportunity to bring in professional chefs to work with their child nutrition staffs on preparing meals that will appeal to students while adhering to new federal regulations.

In a Tulsa World op-ed, David Blatt shared seven things Oklahoma can do to balance the state budget without doing more damage to our health, safety, or economic well-being. Craig General Hospital in Vinita has become the seventh rural Oklahoma hospital to declare bankruptcy in the past five years. OK Policy previously discussed how Oklahoma’s refusal to accept federal funds for health coverage is devastating rural hospitals. The Oklahoman editorial board wrote that a move toward smarter corrections-related policies is underway in Oklahoma. On any given day, more than 100 people diagnosed with a mental illness sit in Oklahoma’s county jails awaiting treatment.

On April 9, the University of Tulsa will host economist Dean Baker for a lecture titled “Inequality in American Society – Should We Blame the Market?” A former chief administrator of the state Workers Compensation Court says the new system adopted last year is among the worst in the country for injured workers. An NPR investigation showed how injured workers suffer as “reforms” limit Workers’ Compensation benefits. Former Oklahoma City Mayor Kirk Humphreys is under fire for comments he made on a local television broadcast saying the Putnam City schools once had a better gene pool.

The rate of American Indians diagnosed with HIV or AIDS nearly doubled in one year, state Health Department data shows. The OK Policy Blog previously shared a Q&A on HIV and AIDS in Oklahoma. The Principal Chief of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation responded to the tribal council’s vote of no confidence in a two-page letter Friday. A sense of despair has settled over efforts to get enough funding from the Legislature to open the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum. New data released Tuesday by the Oklahoma Employment Securities Commission shows that state has lost about 500 energy industry jobs between December 2014 and January 2015.

The Number of the Day is the decrease in eligible voter turnout in Oklahoma from 2010 to 2014. In today’s Policy Note, Vox shared 4 charts that show how race makes a difference in the lives of working families.

continue reading In The Know: Superintendent Hofmeister to join March 30 education rally

In The Know: State budget shortfall could harm education, health care

by | March 20th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Faced with spending reductions due to the state’s $611 million shortfall, agency heads warn that the shortfall could prompt teacher layoffs and less access to medical care. We’ve previously presented options for a balanced approach to solve the budget gap. The US Geological Survey is crafting new earthquake hazard maps for Oklahoma due to the state’s recent increased seismicity, and expects to release them later this year.

On the OK Policy Blog, we noted that HB 1749, which would ban payroll deductions for membership dues for school employees’ unions, essentially punishes Oklahoma teachers for speaking out. Writing in the Journal Record, Arnold Hamilton argued that the bill is a warning to all public employees. The Oklahoman’s Editorial Board said that new Oklahoma City Public Schools Superintendent Rob Neu must act quickly to reform his district’s discipline system, which saw the highest suspension rates of Black and Hispanic students in the US in 2011-12.

The number of active hate groups in Oklahoma has declined sharply, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, but experts warn that the groups may simply have moved online, which makes them harder to track. Farmers across the state report that the wild hog population is growing, and is increasingly destructive to crops and farm land.  The Oklahoma Corporation Commission is hearing from Oklahoma Gas & Electric over plans to hike rates as OG&E moves away from coal-fired power plants to comply with federal pollution regulations, but some are concerned that OG&E’s plan is more expensive than necessary. 

New influenza deaths have pushed the state’s death toll for this flu season to 101, well past last year’s record of 72. As bills banning municipalities and counties from banning fracking (HB 2178, SB 809)  move through the state legislature, some officials are expressing concerns that the bills could have unintended consequences. The Number of the Day is the average premium cost change for the lowest-cost silver-level plan available in Oklahoma’s health insurance marketplace from 2014 to 2015 (from $206 to $201, before subsidies). In today’s Policy Note, Governing writes that decades of stagnant wages for workers is costing states and localities tax revenue.

continue reading In The Know: State budget shortfall could harm education, health care

In The Know: More budget cuts will increase Oklahoma teacher-shortage crisis

by and | March 19th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

State superintendent Joy Hofmeister told legislators that Oklahoma is in the midst of a “teacher shortage” crisis and more cuts to common education would make the teacher shortage much worse. Oklahoma’s top Medicaid officer says the health care program needs $120 million more state dollars next year just to maintain services at current levels for the more than 800,000 young, elderly and disabled Oklahomans it serves each month. David Blatt’s Journal Record column points out that in the face of a $600 million-plus budget shortfall, it should be an easy choice for lawmakers to halt Oklahoma’s scheduled tax cut that was never meant to take effect in these conditions.

NewsOK reported on how American Indians are missing out on important benefits due to stigmas and misinformation about the Affordable Care Act. Even though the House and Senate passed nearly identical bills to ban texting while driving, the bills may die because the two chambers of the Legislature are refusing to give each other’s bill a hearing. The Tulsa World editorial board argued that the anti-texting bill did not go far enough.  Droppings left by a flock of geese on a Grand Lake beach followed by heavy rain were initially responsible for the elevated waterborne bacteria levels that caused the area to be closed to swimmers from June 3 into November.

OK Policy is now accepting applications from college students who want to attend the third annual Summer Policy Institute in August. An official petition drive has begun to remove Muscogee (Creek) Nation Principal Chief George Tiger from office. The City of Oklahoma City’s website has been hit with two denial-of-service attacks, where someone in control of large numbers of computers infected with a virus directs them to overload the website’s server with requests. Ward 6 Councilwoman Meg Salyer won reelection on March 3 with just 675 votes, the lowest vote total for a winner in any council election in at least 20 years.

The Number of the Day is the net revenue of new immigrant owned businesses in Oklahoma in 2010, 5.3 percent of all net business income in the state. In today’s Policy Note, Kaiser Health News reported that as part of a settlement between credit rating agencies and the New York Attorney General, the agencies have agreed to be more flexible about the effect of medical debt on credit scores.

continue reading In The Know: More budget cuts will increase Oklahoma teacher-shortage crisis

In The Know: New study addresses surge of Oklahoma earthquakes, predicts major ones

by and | March 18th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

New research on earthquakes in Oklahoma explains why injection wells may cause quakes here and warns of the possibility for big ones. A national consultant said Oklahoma Gas & Electric could save as much as $3.3 billion if it included more wind and natural gas in its power portfolio, as the utility asks to spend $1.1 billion and hike rates 15- to 20-percent to fund upgrades to aging power plants. After the City of Duncan missed out on a round of drought relief grants from the state, city officials are looking for other ways to keep water flowing. Emergency personnel say a wildfire that charred 37 square miles in rural western Oklahoma and destroyed at least six structures is about 70 percent contained.

A new fact sheet from Oklahoma Policy Institute lays out seven options that lawmakers could use to close Oklahoma’s $611 million budget hole without calamitous cuts to public services. The executive director of the Association of County Commissioners of Oklahoma was fired Tuesday, after a prosecutor asked for an investigation into allegations of “official misconduct.” Oklahoma’s unemployment rate held steady in January — unchanged from December at 3.7 percent.

Tulsa World columnist Ginnie Graham made a case for replacing Andrew Jackson with Cherokee leader Wilma Mankiller. NewsOK examined a long history of racially offensive incidents at OU and OSU. A Walgreens report found Oklahoma was the top state and Oklahoma City the top metro in the nation for flu activity this season. OK Policy previously discussed why nearly all Oklahomans should get a flu shot

Nonprofit news organization Oklahoma Watch will present a public forum on April 16 about challenges in low-income neighborhoods in south Oklahoma City. The Number of the Day is the percent of students who graduated from 4 year above colleges or universities in Oklahoma with student loan debt in 2012. In today’s Policy Note, the Los Angeles Times shares a Q&A on why Affordable Care Act costs continue to fall.

continue reading In The Know: New study addresses surge of Oklahoma earthquakes, predicts major ones

  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. ...
  10. 99