In The Know: Two sentencing reform bills pass out of House committee

by | February 27th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (2)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Under two bills that passed House committee this week, judges would be allowed to reduce mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent offenders, and some inmates who successfully pass a drug treatment program would get chance to go before a judge and receive a suspended sentence. A Senate committee will consider a measure that would allow district courts to review arbitrator decisions in termination cases involving officers accused of excessive use of force or aggravated sexual assault. The McAlester City Council has voted unanimously to approve new body cameras for the city’s police force. Rep. Claudia Griffith has withdrawn her bill to protect the privacy of victims who were caught on cameras used by law enforcement, because it had been drastically changed by an amendment from another legislator to give public officials wide latitude to deny open records requests.

In a lawsuit that pitted Attorney General Scott Pruitt against former Attorney General Drew Edmondson, a judge ruled the Humane Society of the United States must turn over one contested document and portions of two others to Pruitt’s office but can keep the contents of more than 21 other documents secret. On the OK Policy Blog, we shared seven tips for getting your legislators’ attention. KOSU shared the audio from an “On Tap” event where OK Policy’s David Blatt and the Oklahoma Council of Public Affair’s Jonathan Small discussed the state’s $611M budget shortfall. A Senate panel passed a measure that would allow liquor stores to sell refrigerated, high-point beer.

The Regional Food Bank has doubled the amount of food they donate annually the last six years, but officials say it’s still not enough to help all of the Oklahomans battling hunger. Oklahoma City schools have managed to provide winter coats to all students, after having to cancel classes several times last year due to frigid temperatures and kids walking to school not having coats. A committee at Capitol Hill High School charged with selecting a replacement for the Redskins mascot, which is offensive to many Native Americans, has come up with four alternatives. The Tulsa World reported that while Sen. Jim Inhofe threw a snowball on the Senate floor in his attempts to deny the science of climate change, a small town in Oklahoma is playing a big role in that science.

OG&E is asking Oklahoma regulators to allow it to increase customer charges by $1.1 billion for federal environmental compliance and to replace an aging natural gas plant. A law that would have prohibited municipalities from restricting oil and gas drilling has been changed in committee to say that cities must reimburse mineral rights owners for any regulations that could reduce revenue from oil and gas on their land. Oklahoma City’s economic consultant, Russell Evans, told the city council that the latest indications show consumers remain confident in the future despite falling oil prices. Energy companies will cut between 400 and 500 workers per month on average this year, according to the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce’s 2015 Economic Forecast. With wind energy production in full swing in Oklahoma, legislative leaders are looking to impose some new restrictions on the booming industry.

The Number of the Day is the total number of llamas in Oklahoma in 2012. In today’s Policy Note, the New York Times shares how low-income Americans are piling on extra jobs and hours in attempts to escape the coverage gap created by states that are refusing federal funds to expand Medicaid.

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In The Know: Hydrocodone no longer No. 1 drug prescribed to Oklahoma’s Medicaid patients

by and | February 26th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

A powerful painkiller linked to hundreds of prescription drug overdose deaths in Oklahoma recently dropped from its spot as the drug most prescribed to state Medicaid patients. A House committee approved legislation allowing terminally ill patients access to medications that have received preliminary approval from the Food and Drug Administration but are not yet on pharmacy shelves. State Sen. Greg Treat said one of the most embarrassing things for Oklahoma is that the state still does not have an accredited Office of Chief Medical Examiner. We previously discussed how problems at the Medical Examiner’s Officer are a clear result of Oklahoma’s chronic underfunding of public services.

In the Journal Record, David Blatt discussed how the proliferation of tax cuts and tax breaks have contributed to the state’s current $611 million budget hole. On the OK Policy Blog, we gave an overview of Oklahoma’s Rainy Day Fund and how it might be used to help close the budget hole. Oklahoma would add its name to the list of states calling for a national constitutional convention under a resolution adopted Wednesday by the House Rules Committee. We previously discussed how a constitutional convention could destabilize the entire nation and radically rework the Constitution.

Judges would be allowed to reduce mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent offenders under a proposed law that passed out of a state House committee Wednesday. The same committee narrowly passed a measure that would make fines and sentences for cattle theft steeper than they are for aggravated assault. A Tulsa man given a life sentence at 13-years-old for a murder in which he was not the shooter has been released on parole after 17 years in prison. 

A Senate panel passed a measure that could lead to replacing end-of-instruction exams with the ACT. A Tulsa Regional Chamber spokeswoman said that a rash of controversial bills being heard at the Capitol has the rest of the nation thinking Oklahoma is backward and is hurting our business climate. Tulsa World columnist Ginnie Graham discussed how a House committee hearing on a bill to protect conversion therapy included false statistics and made no mention of the overwhelming consensus among professionals in the medical, mental health and social work fields that the therapy can harm a child psychologically. 

Oklahoma banks boosted profits by 10 percent in 2014, earning a record $1.3 billion even as the number of banks in the state continues to decrease. In a quarterly report, Chesapeake Energy revealed that the company won’t be drilling as much in 2015 due to lower energy prices and plans to slash spending by more than $2 billion. A House committee approved a bill that would allow counties to levy a severance tax on rock, sand, gravel, granite and limestone mining operations if approved by a vote of the people. A bill to limit eminent domain seizures in Oklahoma has been withdrawn amid concerns it would threaten plans for a major electricity transmission project connecting state wind farms to consumers in the South and on the East Coast.

The Number of the Day is amount awarded to 17 Oklahoma health centers from a 2015 grant program under the Affordable Care Act. In today’s Policy Note, the New York Times shows how Obamacare is working to make health care affordable for tens of millions of Americans.

continue reading In The Know: Hydrocodone no longer No. 1 drug prescribed to Oklahoma’s Medicaid patients

In The Know: School voucher bill OK’d by Senate committee

by and | February 25th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

A bill allowing public education dollars to go to private schools narrowly passed the Senate Finance Committee and is headed to the full Senate. The bill was amended in committee to remove a provision that would have allowed public education dollars to go to home schools. A new report from the Center for Civil Rights Remedies finds that African American students in the Oklahoma City school system are more likely to face suspension during their high school years than students in any other district in the nation. On the OK Policy Blog, we examine Governor Fallin’s new “OKStateStats” website that the governor says will become the basis of “performance-based budgeting” for state agencies. At a “Politics On Tap” event this evening in Oklahoma City, OK Policy’s David Blatt and OCPA’s Jonathan Small will discuss the state’s $600 million budget shortfall.

NPR examined fears that a prolonged drop in oil prices could endanger Oklahoma’s banks. The Tulsa World examined conflicts between the Osage Nation and small oil drillers in Osage County whose permits have been delayed for an environmental assessment. Rep. Doug Cox wrote an op-ed arguing for Oklahoma to increase the tobacco tax to boost education funding. A bill that seeks to protect the controversial practice of gay conversion therapy passed out of an Oklahoma House committee. A bill allowing school districts to develop rape and sexual assault programs for both students and staff passed unanimously through a House committee.

A proposal to force certain sex offenders in Oklahoma to undergo chemical castration as a condition of release from prison has failed in a state Senate committee. The state’s mental health commissioner has apologized to a judge who had threatened to jail her because a mentally ill criminal defendant did not get treatment for six months. Oklahoma Watch profiled Exodus House groups in Tulsa and Oklahoma City that are providing treatment for drug and alcohol abuse to a few ex-offenders for the first time in their lives.

Oklahoma seniors and disabled people have saved nearly $191 million on medicine in the last four years because the Affordable Care Act is closing the “doughnut hole” coverage gap in Medicare. The Oklahoma House of Representatives on Tuesday passed an anti-texting while driving bill after years of resistance, though the bill received criticism for not going far enough. News9 reported that a bill passed last year to reduce uninsured driving in Oklahoma is not having much impact. The Oklahoma editorial board warned that Oklahoma’s Open Records Act is under attack. A KRJH investigation that fewer than half of the dash cameras purchased by the Tulsa Policy Department under court order are actually in use.

The Number of the Day is the percentage of black male secondary students in Oklahoma City Public Schools who were suspended at least once in 2011-12, the highest suspension rate in the nation. In today’s Policy Note, Vox explains how harsh school discipline policies have created a school to prison pipeline.

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In The Know: Treasurer says he will sue state to protect unclaimed property beneficiaries if Legislature passes bill

by and | February 24th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

State Treasurer Ken Miller said a bill being pushed by insurance companies in the Oklahoma Legislature is so bad for consumers that he would sue the state if it were ever passed. On the OK Policy Blog, a guest post from Treasurer Miller’s Oklahoma Economic Report warns against Oklahoma’s passage of repeated tax cuts without saying how they will be paid for. Appropriations and budget subcommittees in the House and Senate are meeting with agency leaders this week to find out how they would handle budget cuts ranging as high as 10 percent. Oklahoma Arts Council Director Amber Sharples said they would have to cut community arts programs in rural Oklahoma.

Fallin’s finance secretary, Preston Doerflinger, said he may have found a source of savings in agency travel costs, memberships to other organizations, and promotional and events expenses, or what his office calls “swag,” but Oklahoma Watch reported that there may not be much savings to be found from cutting those expenses. Longtime Tulsa oil leaders discussed how the oil price collapse of 2015 compares to the oil bust of 1985. Former U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn came to the state Capitol to urge lawmakers to pass a bill calling for a Constitutional Convention to change the U.S. Constitution. On the OK Policy Blog, we explained why a constitutional convention would put everything at risk with a process that cannot be controlled.

The House approved a bill allowing Oklahoma district attorneys to collect DNA samples for the state’s offender database from defendants who aren’t sentenced to prison. On the OK Policy Blog, we previously explained how indiscriminate DNA testing could lead to false convictions of innocent Oklahomans. A bill establishing a six-month mandatory minimum sentence for eluding police has been pulled back for revision after pushback against mandatory minimums. The OK Policy Blog previously examined how excessive mandatory minimums have contributed to the state’s incarceration crisis. An Oklahoma Watch investigation showed how ex-offenders face a steep price to reinstate their driver’s license, which creates a major barrier to getting a job and reintegrating with society. A professional bull riding circuit has expressed interest in bringing back Oklahoma’s prison rodeo, which has been cancelled due to budget cuts. Tulsa County and the city of Tulsa are inching closer to a deal on a new jail agreement.

The House Common Education Committee approved a bill to make permanent the changes made to the state’s third-grade reading sufficiency requirements last year. A bill in the state Senate could set up a water fight between eastern Oklahoma and the drought-stricken west. The Tulsa World spoke with teachers about how black history is being taught in Oklahoma schools today. Oklahoma Muslims and their interfaith supporters will visit the state Capitol Friday, despite a threatened protest by an anti-Muslim group.

The Number of the Day is the percentage of Tulsa County residents who claimed the Earned Income Tax Credit in 2012. In today’s Policy Note, the Washington Post examines the underrated economic benefit of parents who work less.

continue reading In The Know: Treasurer says he will sue state to protect unclaimed property beneficiaries if Legislature passes bill

In The Know: Okla. debate over US history overshadows education cuts

by and | February 23rd, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (1)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

While Oklahoma lawmakers debate controversial funding cuts for an Advanced Placement United States history course, critics said the measure is a politicized distraction that overshadows the greater threat to education posed by insufficient school funding. Tulsa high school teacher John Waldron wrote that the threat to AP U.S. history is part of a general assault on public education. Oklahoma City Schools superintendent Robert Neu wrote that the state Legislature is the greatest threat to Oklahoma public education today.

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday in the case of a Tulsa Muslim who was denied a job at Abercrombie & Fitch because she wears a head covering. Nearly a third of Oklahoma’s 308 nursing homes experienced a drop in their public rating as the federal government adopted new, more rigorous standards. KGOU examined how large, off-the-top transfers to transportation has contributed to the funding crunch for other state needs.

In the latest OK PolicyCast, we share a panel discussion on what’s really going on in Oklahoma’s economy. The Tulsa World wrote that a bill that would undermine the Oklahoma Open Records Act sailed through a legislative committee Thursday without any discussion of its most pernicious provision. A new peer-reviewed paper published in the journal Science urges greater collaboration and transparency between industry, government agencies and researchers in responding to the consequences of earthquakes triggered by oil and gas activity.

The Tulsa World reported that a dramatic drop in the number of meth labs in Oklahoma has lead to Mexican cartels filling the void. The Number of the Day is Oklahoma’s place in Gallup’s 2014 State Well-Being Ranking. In today’s Policy Note, Bloomberg Business reported on how more religious groups in the South are joining the fight against predatory payday lending.

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In The Know: Proposed changes to Open Records Act pass committee

by | February 20th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

A bill that would allow a public body to deny Open Records Requests if its officials believe the request would cause “excessive disruption of (its) essential function” has passed out of committee in the House. Senate panels passed measures that would ban texting while driving and smoking in vehicles if a minor is present. Writing in the OK Policy Blog, the Executive Director of Oklahoma Corrections Professionals urged lawmakers to pass common sense sentencing reforms.

The Tulsa World examined the impact of Wal-Mart’s wage increase in Oklahoma. The Cherokee Nation as adopted a new maternity leave policy that will provide female employees with eight weeks of fully paid leave. Oklahoma has received more than $10 million in federal grands for a program that provides home visitations to pregnant women and parents with young children.

This year’s flu season statewide death count has reached 84, a new record. StateImpact explained that increased municipal interest on drilling regulations has state lawmakers considering limits on “local control.”  The Number of the Day is the number of health plans selected in Oklahoma on Healthcare.gov from Nov. 15, 2014, through Feb. 15, 2015. In today’s Policy Note, the New York Times shares how unusually bipartisan coalitions have formed to advocate for criminal justice reform.

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In The Know: 125,000 Oklahomans have signed up for health insurance under Affordable Care Act

by and | February 19th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Federal health officials say nearly 125,000 Oklahomans have signed up for health insurance coverage through the federal marketplace created under the Affordable Care Act. Oklahoma’s judicial system is among those facing budget a budget cut this year, raising questions about whether it would be able to collect as much in court fines and fees that help fund other state agencies. Three weeks after the Tulsa County parks director recommended closing three county swimming pools, county officials on Tuesday took $500,000 from the Parks Department reserve fund to keep the Tulsa Jail operating through June.

State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister said Wednesday that she is “partnering” with a Yukon lawmaker to revise a highly controversial bill that sought to ban the teaching of AP US History. On the OK Policy Blog, we looked at the hot-button issues that so far haven’t gotten much attention this legislative session. David Blatt’s Journal Record column discussed how for many ex-felons in Oklahoma, it can be illegal to get a job.

The Tulsa World editorial board argued in support of a bill to increase cigarette taxes as a way to partially close the state’s $611.3 million budget hole. A House committee approved three state question proposals to have the governor and lieutenant governor run on the same ticket, create a constitutional amendment to expand gun rights, and call a state constitutional convention. A bill to establish guidelines for court-ordered mental health treatment advanced out of committee after lawmakers moved its effective date to 2016, because they don’t have money to fund it this year.

As cities are considering tougher rules on fracking, state lawmakers have filed at least eight bills to take local control away from municipalities for regulating oil and gas drilling. A bill that would bar workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity will not get a hearing in the House. The Number of the Day is the percentage of Oklahomans age 18-64 who receive Social Security disability assistance. In today’s Policy Note, Bloomberg discusses a survey showing low-income Americans are far more worried about saving enough for retirement than other Americans.

continue reading In The Know: 125,000 Oklahomans have signed up for health insurance under Affordable Care Act

In The Know: Oklahoma budget hole reaches $611 million

by and | February 18th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

State agencies in Oklahoma are being told to brace for budget cuts after a state board led by Gov. Mary Fallin certified that the Legislature will have $611 million less to spend this year. OK Policy released a statement that the budget shortfall cannot be blamed only on the slowdown in the energy industry, as legislators have repeatedly voted to cut taxes and expand tax breaks. State officials said all options are on the table to address the budget hole, but ruled out canceling a cut to the top income rate that adds $50 million to the shortfall this year.

Two bills that would require stricter oversight of various state tax credits and incentives have cleared a Senate committee. Members of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Education approved measures that would boost teacher salaries and pump more money into Oklahoma classrooms, while acknowledging they do not know how to pay for them. Together Oklahoma discussed seven ways to get your legislators’ attention about an issue.

An Oklahoma Watch investigation showed how two private companies that provide banking services in prisons are extracting onerous fees from inmates’ family members. Tulsa has seen a rash of self-defense shootings this year by civilians or security guards. A House committee moved forward two bills that would discontinue state marriage licenses and forbid state and local government employees, including judges, from complying with federal rulings on same-sex marriage. Another Oklahoma bill would require couples to prove they don’t have a communicable disease before getting a marriage license.

Oklahoma’s attorney general is praising a ruling by a federal judge in South Texas who has temporarily blocked President Barack Obama’s executive action on immigration. The number of heroin deaths increased tenfold during a recent five-year period, according to a recently updated state Health Department report, but the increase could be due to both more heroin usage and better reporting. Chesapeake Energy Corp filed suit Tuesday alleging its founder and former chief executive, Aubrey K. McClendon, stole confidential company data during his last months on the job in order to launch his new oil and gas empire.

Oklahoma City is looking at building a 29-mile pipeline to move more water from reservoirs in the south to the drought-stricken north side of the city. Efforts to save monarch butterflies in Oklahoma and nationwide are underway after years of declining population. The Number of the Day is the estimated lifetime earnings of an Oklahoma City Public Schools teacher, lowest out of all 125 large districts studied in a national report. In today’s Policy Note, Vox debunks the myth that there are more black men in prison than in college.

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In The Know: Oklahoma’s prison inmate homicide rate leads nation

by and | February 17th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

Oklahoma has the highest rate of prison homicides in the nation, with state inmates killed at a rate more than three times the national average, according to the latest figures from the Bureau of Justice Statistics. At the first meeting of Gov. Mary Fallin’s Justice Reform Steering Committee, officials said the state’s budget problems won’t put the brakes on criminal justice reform. KGOU discussed the many barriers faced by convicted felons leaving Oklahoma prisons with a mountain of debt and few chances to get a job.

A House committee approved a bill to ban the teaching of AP US History, and some opponents of Common Core are questioning the legality of teaching any Advanced Placement courses in Oklahoma schools. On the okeducationtruths blog, an Oklahoma teacher refuted some of the misinformation being spread about the AP US History curriculum. Three national experts advised Oklahoma education leaders on Monday to look to other states’ examples of proven math and English/language arts standards. 

The reported distribution of Bibles in several Oklahoma public schools by the son of a state representative has sparked letters of complaint from the Freedom from Religion Foundation. A Senate panel passed a bill Monday that would let public education dollars go toward private and home schooling. KGOU examined how the frequent earthquakes caused by the oil and gas industry are impacting a small community in Oklahoma. On the OK Policy Blog, the Scholars Strategy Network’s Rachael V. Cobb discussed her research showing the many benefits of online voter registration.

Rep. John Bennett, R-Sallisaw – has filed a bill to allow anyone with a license to carry a handgun to take the weapon into the state Capitol. A bill to ban texting while driving cleared a House committee. NewsOK reporter Jaclyn Cosgrove examined challenges faced by thousands of Oklahoma who struggle to pay heat bills each year. StateImpact Oklahoma discussed the geographic divide in Oklahoma between those who have plenty of water and those who desperately need it. Northeastern Oklahoma will have access to a new digital broadcast channel devoted to Native American and indigenous content starting March 1.

The Number of the Day is the approximate number of Oklahoma high school students who scored high enough on the AP US History exam in 2013 to earn college credit. In today’s Policy Note, Robert Greenstein discussed why a constitutional convention could be the single most dangerous way to ‘fix’ American government.

continue reading In The Know: Oklahoma’s prison inmate homicide rate leads nation

In The Know: Budget cuts might mean more State Park closures in 2015

by and | February 16th, 2015 | Posted in In The Know | Comments (0)

In The KnowIn The Know is a daily synopsis of Oklahoma policy-related news and blogs. Inclusion of a story does not necessarily mean endorsement by the Oklahoma Policy Institute. You can sign up here to receive In The Know by e-mail.

The Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department is considering more state park closures as the state faces a budget hole of more than $600 million dollars. A children’s mental health program at Hillcrest Medical Center is shutting down due to a loss of federal funding because of Oklahoma’s refusal to accept Medicaid expansion dollars. Tulsa Public Schools made the White House’s top 100 list for U.S. school districts at risk of taking the largest federal funding hit if House Republicans succeed with a measure to limit the federal role in public education.

On the OK Policy Blog, Steve Lewis commented on 5 ideas to fix the state budget. OK Policy’s Gene Perry wrote an op-ed in The Oklahoman on why Oklahoma needs to remove barriers to rebuilding a life after prison. We previously discussed this issue at greater length on the OK Policy Blog. Oklahoma charges one of the highest rates in the US to friends and family members who want to make a phone call to their loved ones in prison. The Oklahoma Health Care Authority board voted to clarify rules that limit some adult Medicaid recipients to one pharmacy and one physician when obtaining powerful painkillers and anti-anxiety medications.

At least three bills have been filed in the Legislature to eliminate the state’s nearly six-decade ban on carrying switchblades. The Tulsa World examined how Oklahoma has spent nearly $70 million on an initiative to encourage marriage. An OK Policy Blog series previously discussed whether the state of Oklahoma should be promoting marriage with funds meant to fight poverty. The Oklahoma Standards Setting Steering Committee will hold a forum Monday and Tuesday to hear from national experts on the processes used in other states to set K-12 academic standards. Two workers who were injured on the job have filed a legal challenge to a provision that allows employers to opt out of Oklahoma’s workers’ compensation system.

NewsOK spoke to an obesity researcher at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center about how rates of obesity got so bad in Oklahoma. A former Tulsa County sheriff’s deputy was bound over for trial for alleged sex crimes involving two women he encountered while on duty. New federal research says small earthquakes shaking Oklahoma and southern Kansas daily are dramatically increasing the chance of bigger and dangerous quakes. Scientists have linked these quakes to the wastewater disposal wells used by the oil and gas industry. Oklahoman editorial board editor J.E. McReynolds announced his retirement.

The Number of the Day is how many years Oklahoma has gone without raising its gas tax, second only to Alaska. In today’s Policy Note, the American Conservative explains why Virginia’s Republican ex-attorney general is taking on the incarceration state.

continue reading In The Know: Budget cuts might mean more State Park closures in 2015

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