Food Insecurity

Food security is defined as “ready availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods.” The measure was introduced by the U.S. Census Bureau in 1996 to assess households’ ability to consistently obtain three nutritionally adequate meals a day. Households can be rated as being food secure, low food secure, or very low food secure. A food insecure household is one that at times during the year, was uncertain of having, or unable to acquire, enough food to meet the needs of all their members because they had insufficient money or other resources for food. In very low food security households, normal eating patterns of one or more household members were disrupted and food intake was reduced at times during the year because they had insufficient money or other resources for food. Very low food security corresponds to the common understanding of hunger.

Nationally, 10.5 percent of households were food insecure in 2019, including 4.1 percent that had very low food security, or hunger. In Oklahoma, 14.7 percent of households experienced food insecurity on average from 2017-19, which was the 5th highest rate in the nation. This included 5.3 percent of households that experienced very low food security, or hunger, which was the 10th highest rate in the nation.

Food insecurity and very low food security are more prevalent in households with children, especially young children, single-parent households, Black and Hispanic households, and low-income households.